The following article was printed in McCLURE'S MAGAZINE

McClure's Magazine
July, 1913

THE MONTESSORI MOVEMENT
A McClure Department
CONDUCTED BY ELLEN YALE STEVENS

Sections and Links:
Where is the Montessori material manufactured, and at what price?
Can you furnish a Montessori Bibliography?
How can teachers trained in this method be obtained?
Where are the schools located in which the method is in use? Will there be a training course in Rome next year, or lectures and classes in this country this summer?
Does Dr. Montessori approve of teaching young children a foreign language?
What information can you give regarding Dr. Montessori's extension of her method into primary grades?
Can you recommend any books suitable for the development of the senses of rhythm and tone?

Two years ago MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE published an article on the work of the great Italian educator. Dr. Maria Montessori. The article described the new ideas that Dr. Montessori had introduced in education, and the success that she had met with in her first schools in Rome. At that time Dr. Montessori was scarcely known outside of a limited circle in her own country. In a few weeks, however, her name had reached practically every part of the civilized world. Few magazine articles have attracted such widespread and spontaneous interest. The press of the United States and of nearly every country in Europe reprinted the article in whole or in part, and letters have come flowing into the MCCLURE office by the thousand.

In view of this great and increasing interest, the editors of MCCLURE'S decided to publish every month a regular Montessori Department, to serve as a central bureau of information regarding the progress of the movement and as an open forum for discussion. Correspondence is particularly invited. A place will be found for letters of interest, and, when possible. Dr. Montessori's own reply to special questions will be obtained.

Answers to Correspondents

A MULTITUDE of letters have come to this department in response to the request for correspondence. These have in every case been answered; but so many questions appear over and over again that it seems wise to select a number for public reply in this issue of the magazine. In the August number, Dr. Montessori's views on the imagination of the child, and its training, will be discussed, and questions referring to that phase of the method will be answered then.

Where is the Montessori material manufactured, and at what price?

The didactic material used in the Montessori method of educating young children is manufactured in this country only by the House of Childhood, 200 Fifth Avenue, New York City. The price is fifty dollars, which includes a copy of the translation in English of Dr. Montessori's book. The material is manufactured and sold in England by Philips & Tacey, London, and in Italy by Pizzoli & Co., Milan. Dr. Montessori has in preparation a manual of instruction for the use of the material.

Can you furnish a Montessori bibliography?

The following bibliography of the Montessori movement includes books and articles published up to April, 1913:
---------
ANDERSON, Mrs. J. S. The Montessori Method of Teaching Hearing Children. Volta Review, 14: 154-68. June, 1912.

BURROWS, H. Spontaneous Education; the Montessori Method. Contemporary Review,. 102: 329-37. September, 1912.

ELSSON, J. P. What Really Is the Montessori Method? Ladies' Home Journal, 29: 30. November, 1912.

FISHER, D. C. Montessori Mother. Published by Henry Holt & Co. FisHER,Laura. Montessori System. 5cicoZ,24: 123. December 5, 1912.

GEORGE, Anne E. Dr. Maria Montessori; an account of the achievements and personality of an Italian woman whose discovery is revolutionizing educational methods. Good Housekeeping, 55: 24-9. July, 1912.

First Montessori School in America. McClure's, 39: 177-87. June, 1912.

GESELL, A. L. & GESELL, B. C. The Montessori Kindergarten. (In their The Normal Child and Primary Education, 1912, pp. 323-40.)

GRUENBERG, S. M . What Is the Montessori Method? Scientific American, 106: 564-5. June 22, 1912.

HAILMAN, W. N . A Glimpse of the Montessori Method. Kindergarten-Primary Magazine, 24: 261-63. June, 1912.

Montessori Method and the Kindergarten. Kindergarten-Primary Magazine, 25: 2-7. September, 1912.

HOLMES, W. H. Montessori Methods. Education, 33: i-io. September, 1912.

HUNT, Harriet E. Psychology of Auto-Education, Based on the Interpretation of Intellect Given by Henri Bergeon in His "Creative Evolution." Illustrated in the work of Maria Montessori. 1912.

INFORMATION about the Montessori Method. McClure's, 37: 702-4. October, 1911.

KENNEDY, M . J. The Montessori System. American Primary Teacher, 30: 368-69. June, 1912.

MARGULIES, Mrs. A. R. Montessori Method and the Deaf Child. Volta Review, 14: 48-9, 74-85. April-May, 1912.

Montessori Method AppHcable to the Deaf. Volta Review, 14: 146-7. June, 1912. MAY, M . G . A New Method in Infant Education. Journal of Education (London), 31: 645-7. September, 1909.

MERRILL, J. B. New Method in Infant Education. Kindergarten-Primary Magazine, 24: 96-8. December, 1911.

New Method in Kindergarten Education.. Kindergarten-Primary Magazine, 22: 106-7, 142-4, 211-12, 297-8, December, 1909- March, 1910.

MONTESSORI, Maria, M. D. Disciplining Children. McClnre's, 39: 95-102. May, 1912.

Il metode della pedagogica scientifica, applicate all'educazione infantile nelle case dei bambini. 1909.

The Montessori Method . . . with additions and revisions by the author. Translated by Anne E. George, with an introduction by Professor H. W. Holmes. 1912. Price, $1.75; postpaid, $1.90. Published by Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York.

Pedagogical Anthropology. Translated by F. T. Cooper, Published by Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Price, $3.50; postpaid, $3.75.

Montessori Method. American Education, 15: 302. March, 1912.

Montessori Method; by M. Montessori. Review. Dial, 52: 392-4. May 16, 1912.

Montessori method in specially designed school; "Northampton charts" will also be a feature of instruction at Torresdale House. Volta Review, 14: 553. December, 1912.

Montessori Method; Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. Athenaeum, No. 4,415: 645. June 8, 1912.

Montessori Method; Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses, by M. Montessori. Review. Educational Review, 43: 529-33. May, 1912.

Montessori Method; Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. Review. Nation, 94: 563-5. June 6, 1912.

Montessori's Rediscovery of the Ten Fingers. Current Literature, 51: 386. October, 1911.

(Montessori) Movement to Revolutionize Education. Current Literature, 32: 311-14. March, 1912.

O'SHEA, M . V. The .Montessori Method of Teaching. Dial, 52: 392-4. May 16, 1912.

PALMER, h. A. Montessori and Froebelian materials and methods. Elementary School Teacher, 13: 66-79. October, 1912.

REEDER, R. R. Montessori Method of Educating Children. Survey, 27: 1595-7. Jan. 20, 1912. A review of articles appearing in the May and December, 1911, and January, 1912, numbers of McClure's Magazine.

SMITH, A. T. Montessori's System of Education. Umted States Bureau of Education Bulletin, 1912, No. 17.

SMITH, T . L . ' Dr. Maria Montessori and. Her Houses (Of, Childhood.. Pedagogical Seminary, 18: 533-42. December, 1911.

Montessori System in Theory and Practice . . . with Some Reports of American Experience. 1912. Published by Harper Brothers, New York.

BYOIR, C. R. Montessori System; Introduction to the Houses of Childhood. 1912.

STEVENS, E. Y. Montessori and Froebel — a Comparison. Elementary School Teacher, 12: 253-8. February, 1912.

Montessori Method and Primary Education. Primary Education, 20:313-16. June, 1912.

Montessori Method and the American Kindergarten. McClure's, 40: 77-82. November, 1912.

A Guide to the Montessori Method. Published by Frederick A. Stolies Co., New York. Testing Montessori Plan; Union Settlement has Sample Class of Twenty-four; etc. Evening Post, New York, December 4, 1912.

TOZIER, Josephine. An Educational Wonder-Worker: Maria Montessori's Methods. McClure's; 37: 3-19. May, 1911. (Available on this website in HTML format).

The Montessori Apparatus. A Description of the Material and Apparatus Used in Teaching by the Montessori Method. McClure's, 38: 289-302. January, 1912.

Montessori Schools in Rome. McClure's 38: 122-37. December, 1911.

WARREN, H. C. The "House of Childhood," a New Primary System. Journal of Educational Psychology, 3: 121-32. March, 1912.

WILD, L. H. Montessori System and Our American Schools for the Deaf. Journal of Education, 76: 176. August 22, 1912.

WILLIAMS, L. A. Estimate of the Montessori System of Child Training. New York Teachers' Monographs, 14: 25-32. June, 1912.

WINSHIP, A. E. Montessori Methods. Journal of Education (Boston), 75: 399-400. April 11, 1912.

WITMOR, Lightner. A Caution on Montessori. Journal of Education (Boston), 76: 39. July 4, 1912.

Woman, as Child Trainer. Maria Montessori's Houses of Childhood in Italy. Evening Post, New York. January 22, 1912.

How can teachers trained in this method be obtained?

The Montessori American Committee is willing to assist any who desire teachers for Montessori classes or any teachers who desire positions. Address the Committee at 443 Fourth Avenue, New York.

Where are the schools located in which the method is in use?

In addition to the Montessori classes given in the February issue may be mentioned the following schools which have incorporated the Montessori system in their curriculum:

St. Michael's School, Lexington Avenue and 39th St., New York.
Union Settlement Kindergarten, 337 East 104th St., New York.
Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I.
This is, of course, an incomplete list, and does not include schools in Europe.

Will there be a training course in Rome next year,
or lectures and classes in this country this summer?

It is impossible, as yet, to make any announcement regarding a training course in Rome next year or regarding summer courses of lectures or classes by teachers returning from Rome.

Does Dr. Montessori approve of teaching young children a foreign language?

Dr. Montessori expresses herself as heartily in favor of young children learning a foreign language. She favors the direct conversational method, using games, songs, pictures, and charts. The material for sense-training could be explained in one language as well as another. The sandpaper and script alphabets could also be used, and the proper phonetic combinations given.

What information can you give regarding Dr. Montessori's
extension of her method into primary grades?

Reports are reaching us of the success of the method when carried into the primary grades. Dr. Montessori has devised materia! for this purpose, which will soon be put on the market in this country. There should be great economy of time when the technique for writing, number, and reading is acquired in the sub-primary stage. The child who has learned in his first year, at a Montessori school, self-control and intelligent self-direction of his activities, should develop rapidly and independently in the processes of number, in reading for interpretation of thought, and in oral and written expression of his own thoughts.

Can you recommend any books suitable for
the development of the senses of rhythm and tone?

The following have been useful in developing the sense of rhythm, of tone, and of musical expression:
"Play Songs from the Song Senses," by Alys E. Bentley. A. S. Barnes & Co., New York.
"Tone Plays," by the same..
"Music for the Child World," by Marie Ruif Hofer. Clayton F. Summer Co., Chicago.

Matt Bronsil's Note: This article is referenced in my Foreign Language Webinar for being the first, and one of the very few, times Montessori gives any indication of how to teach a foreign language.


Matt Bronsil is the author of these posts. He can be contacted at MattBronsilMontessori@gmail.com

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